DIY Rose Water

8.3.18

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Well, this is it; this is the Valentine's Day themed post I hinted at in my March Goals post. "But, Amaris," you may be asking, "Valentine's Day was weeks ago, aren't you a little late?" Yes, I know Valentine's Day was weeks ago, but today we will be making rose water and what better place to find roses than that almost dried-up Valentine's bouquet you got, hmm?

Related: March Goals

Why rose water?

If you are into skincare as much as I am, then you've noticed the trend in rose skin products. Companies such as Mario Badescu and Herbivore Botanicals are very popular for their rose water products. I rarely see a skin routine that is geared towards my skin type (oily/acne/blemish prone) that does not include either a rose water toner or a rose water mist. I'll admit, at first I was a skeptic. So I did my research on the benefits of rose water and, let's just say, I was pleasantly surprised.

Rose water benefits

Rose water, as the name implies is the extract of rose petals and water, pretty simple. It can be applied topically and ingested, however I would recommend only eating food-grade rose water you buy from the store. Some benefits of rose water are as followed:
  • oil control
  • pH balancer
  • slight astringent
  • anti-bacterial
  • anti-inflammatory
  • heal acne and acne scars
Plus so many more that I won't list here. For me these benefits can help solve some of my skin problems, oh, did I mention it smells divine? 

DIY rose water... is it cost-effective?

So, let's say you buy 12 roses from your local grocery store for $20, and you also buy a gallon of distilled water for a dollar or less. That brings your total to about $21. To make one-half liter of rose water you need four roses and one-half liter of distilled water. With your $20 bouquet and $1 gallon of distilled water you could make two liters of rose water. In comparison you can buy an 8 oz bottle of rose water for about $9. If you do the math, making your own rose water yields over eight times as much as buying, for $18 more. Now to answer the question of if it's cost-effective, yeah, I think it is.

Now that I'm done talking your ear off about this, let's make some rose water, shall we?
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This post contains affiliate links, which means if you purchase something through these links I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you. For more information check out my disclosure. Thank you for supporting Amaris Elizabeth!

Materials

  • petals from 4 roses
  • 500 mL distilled water, plus more to dillute
  • pot
  • strainer
  • 4 oz. mister bottle
  • jar, for storage

Instructions

  • Remove the petals from the roses and give them a rinse. This removes any dirt or residue left on the petals.
  • Place the petals in a pot and cover with 500 mL of water. Make sure the petals are fully covered by the water, you may need to use a spoon to pat them down.
  • Simmer over medium heat for 20 to 30 minutes. I tend to go 30 minutes because I like to suck all the color out of the petals.
  • Remove from heat and strain into a jar. Let cool.
  • Once cool, fill the mister bottle with rose water. I prefer to fill the bottle a third to halfway with rose water and dilute the rest with distilled water. 
  • Use in your skincare and hair care routines.
Note: Store the bottle of rose water in a cool place. Store the jar of rose water in the fridge.
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Do you use rose water in your beauty routine? Let me know how in the comments.
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